The logo is the essential element of a brand.  You know, kind like Kanye’s essential element is his frown; when that frown is upside down, everything kind of feels wrong. So, it’s important to understand the technical difference of using a logo on the web versus for print.

The logo is the essential element of a brand.  You know, kind like Kanye’s essential element is his frown; when that frown is upside down, everything kind of feels wrong. So, it’s important to understand the technical difference of using a logo on the web versus for print. At The Mardiney Group, we’re often asked, “Can you grab our logo from our website to use on our annual report?” Sadly, no, we cannot. No designer can! Let us explain why.

Print requires high resolution images.  The web does not.

Website logos are relative small files, with a resolution of 72 ppi (pixels per inch). Computer monitors can only display images at a relatively low resolution of 72 ppi, so for digital design a 72 ppi logo image will work fine for the web.

Print requires higher resolution images of 300 dpi (dots per inch). So for print treatments, the logo image will need to be of much higher resolution — 300 dpi.

What’s a vector file?  A vector graphic file is a line art file that stores the information on how a logo was built, including information on color, lines, typeface, and shapes.  A vector file is the most versatile of logo file formats as it provides the most flexibility for the graphic designer while also providing the most stable format in terms of consistency and quality. The logo can be scaled from a small sized image to a billboard sized image without loss of quality. This is also known as an eps file.

The last element to consider for logo use is physical size. Although your web-formatted logo should be 72 ppi in resolution, the size of the image should be at least 5 inches wide. The same is true for the 300 dpi print ready image of your logo. Five inches will allow your graphic designer the flexibility to use the logo as a critical design element. This is a general rule of thumb and larger sizes could be needed depending on the project.

At The Mardiney Group, we work with clients to ensure that their logo and identity is treated consistently, distinctively, and in a manner that protects and enhances brand identity. Hope this quick “Learn to Speak Designer” lesson has been useful.

We welcome any questions and input.  Talk to us! We look forward to hearing from you.