Jargon can be a major barrier to effective communication.  With Design Speak, we’ll do our best to define some common designer-ese, ever mindful of our core value of clear communications. If we ever lapse into designer babble, please let us know. We’ll feature your question in Design Speak’s occasional lessons.

Jargon can be a major barrier to effective communication.  With Design Speak, we’ll do our best to define some common designer-ese, ever mindful of our core value of clear communications. If we ever lapse into designer babble, please let us know. We’ll feature your question in Design Speak’s occasional lessons.

Lesson One: What’s the difference between a typeface vs. a font?

In today’s digital age, typeface and font are essentially the same thing, and many use the terms interchangeably. However, long ago, in the age of movable type, the style of type was called a typeface. For example, Verdana is a typeface. Times Roman is a typeface.

Font is what you see. For example, this blog post’s font is Verdana, 11 point.

Let’s say  the typeface your designer has chosen just doesn’t strike your fancy. It’s best if you can drill down a bit and specify why. Is the typeface too modern? Too old-fashioned? Maybe too corporate or too whimsical? Or maybe it’s just too large, in which case, you’d say that it’s the font that’s not quite right, and that a smaller point-size might work better.

Hope Design Speak’s Lesson One has been helpful!